October 20, 2021

The Queens County Citizen

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Pelosi chooses to vote on FISA reauthorization despite GOP requests

Pelosi chooses to vote on FISA reauthorization despite GOP requests

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said the council would move forward with a vote on whether to extend the rule from the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, rejecting the GOP leadership’s request in the lower chamber of Congress.

Speaking to reporters on Capitol Hill Wednesday, Pelosi (D-Calif.) Said of the FISA law, “We will act in one way or another today.”

Asked if there would be a vote today, the country’s highest-ranking Democrat replied, “Yes.”

Pelosi’s decision comes as the bill appears to be on life support, despite the majority of its party in the congressional body.

The bill will re-recognize three surveillance programs that have expired under the Intelligence Reform Act of 2015, the USA Freedom Act, and make some changes to the FISA court.

The legislation was passed in its original form in the House without much support from the Democrats, with only 152 votes in favor.

The bill was reversed during the debate on Senate law, adding legal protections for some FISA warrant applicants. This move forces the bill to be passed back to the House.

When the House began negotiating a newly revised bill earlier this month, a party cracked down on Democrats over some privacy protections.

Last week, Rep. Joe Lofgren (D-Calif.) Made little progress in moving forward with re-authorization by voting on an amendment that would prohibit government access to Americans’ Internet history through an arrangement. FISA Act.

He introduced the amendment to Representative Warren Davidson (R-Ohio) and negotiated with House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff (D-Calif.).

However, the amendment appeared to closely reflect some of the failed contents of the Senate by a single vote.

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That language is Sen. Presented by Ron Wyden (D-Ore.), He shouted heavily at Schiff for a change from praising the House bill. The Oregon Democratic Party accused Schiff of undermining the original speech and called on lawmakers to reject the entire FISA bill.

Now, if there is no GOP support in its current form, there is no guarantee that it will be able to get enough support to reach the 218 votes it needs to pass.

Although the original law was negotiated by Attorney General William Barr and several top allies of the president, the Justice Department’s Bar Committee is now opposed to the bill.

Assistant Attorney General Stephen Boyd chose both the House and Senate to add legislation in a statement Tuesday, saying the department would urge Trump to veto.

“We have proposed specific amendments to the most important issues created by the changes made by the Senate.

On the same day, President Trump called on all House Republicans to stop the legislation.

“I hope all Republican House members will not vote in FISA until our country can determine how and why the greatest political, criminal and worst corruption in US history has happened!” He tweeted.

Shortly before Trump insisted on the GOP opposition on Tuesday, White House press secretary Kylie McNally responded to a question in a press conference with The Post, stating, “Any FISA president is worried, they are real, they are personal, they should be considered as we move forward to re-recognize this valuable tool. “

FISA became law after the watercourse on government surveillance. It sets out the oversight of surveillance of suspected spies and terrorists, but privacy advocates say this is not enough to protect Americans’ freedoms.

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