October 27, 2021

The Queens County Citizen

Complete Canadian News World

2 recall notices issued by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency

2 recall notices issued by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency

Vancouver – The Canadian Food Inspection Agency has issued two separate recall notices: one for the Manila Clams and the other for the wood ear mushroom brand.

The warning, which applies to BC, Alberta and Ontario, which could spread across the country, said the parasite may contain marine biotoxin clams that can cause shellfish poisoning.

The recalled product may have been sold under the Evergreen Intel Foodstuffs Limited brand for 25-pounds. Package. They were harvested in BC on September 16 and processed the next day, but the agency may have sold the clams in large or small packages with or without the label, and may not be the same Brand, product name or code.

Anyone with recalled clams at home should throw them away or return them to the store where they bought them, the CFIA said. If you do not know the source of the claims, the agency will contact you at the place where you purchased them.

The CFIA said parasitic shellfish toxins accumulate in seafood such as oysters, clams, scallops, mussels and cockles.

Some of the symptoms of paralyzed shellfish venom are tingling and numbness of the lips, tongue, hands and feet. It can also cause difficulty swallowing, starting a few minutes later or lasting up to 10 hours after consumption.

“In severe cases, it can lead to gait, muscle paralysis, respiratory paralysis and death,” the agency said.

The recall was initiated through test results from the CFIA and the agency is now conducting food safety research, which could lead to recalls of other products.

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No illnesses were reported from people consuming the product.

The agency on Thursday issued a special recall for the dried wood ear mushroom brand on Salmonella pollution.

CFIA recalls Wismetac Asian Foods Shiraki brand black fungus, or cicure. The agency said the product was sold to hotels, restaurants and other companies.

The product was sold in 2.27 kg bags until September 27 with and including codes.

These were distributed in BC, Alberta and Manitoba, but they were sold nationally, the agency said.

“Food contaminated with salmonella may not look spoiled or make you sick,” the CFIA said in a statement Thursday.

“Young children, pregnant women, the elderly and those with weakened immune systems can develop serious and sometimes fatal infections. Healthy people may experience short-term symptoms such as fever, headache, vomiting, nausea, abdominal cramps and diarrhea.”

The chronic problem may include severe arthritis, the agency said.

The recalled product should be discarded or returned to the place of purchase.

The CFIA says there are diseases in the United States associated with people who eat mushrooms.

According to U.S. Centers for Disease Control, 41 people fell ill in 10 different states. Four patients are required to be hospitalized.