October 16, 2021

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Hezbollah leader welcomes French aid, but says Macron cannot act like Lebanese ruler – National

Hezbollah leader welcomes French aid, but says Macron cannot act like Lebanese ruler - National

Of Hezbollah The leader welcomed his Shia movement French Attempts to help Lebanon Survived the crisis, but not the French president Emmanuel Macron Can act as the ruler of the country.

In a televised speech, Syed Hassan Nasrallah said he was heavily armed, Iran-Backed Hezbollah is ready for dialogue under the French roadmap to get the country out of the recession. But he called for a review of what he called “nutritional behavior.”

Macron, the former French president who led foreign aid operations, rebuked Lebanese sector leaders for failing to quickly accept a new government. This is the first step in a French plan that seeks to mobilize them to launch billions of dollars of unlocked reforms: cash is much needed in Lebanon.

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The French president said he was “ashamed” of Lebanese politicians and felt it was a betrayal because his initiative had failed.

Macron has criticized Lebanon’s two main Shia parties, Hezbollah and its ally Amal, demanding that some ministers, especially the finance post, be named at the heart of Lagzam.

“Who said it was a betrayal?” Nasrallah replied Tuesday. “We are not committed to accepting government in any shape or form.”

“We welcomed President Macron’s visit to Lebanon and we welcomed the French initiative, but he was a judge, jury and executioner and not the ruler of Lebanon.”


Click to play video 'Lebanon protests: Demonstrators open gates of parliament, clash with police'



Lebanon protests: Protesters open parliament gates and clash with police


Lebanon protests: Protesters open parliament gates and clash with police

Naralla accused other former prime ministers, including Sunni leader Saad al-Hariri, of pulling the strings in an attempt to plunder French intervention to achieve political points. He accused them of sidelining Hezbollah and its allies, who have a majority in parliament.

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Prime Minister-designate Mustafa Adib, who is in the process of forming a new cabinet, left over the weekend amid a tussle over seats. He sought to shake up the control of the ministries, some of which have been managed by the same factions for years, including the finance post – which would be hand in hand with making plans to get out of the financial meltdown.

The crisis, Lebanon’s worst after the 1975-1990 civil war, pushed the country to a breaking point, destroying its currency. A massive explosion in the port of Beirut that killed nearly 200 people destroyed the capital in August and prompted the government to resign.

The Amal movement, which elected the last finance minister, had earlier said it would respect Macron’s role, but was “shocked” that his comments were thought to have caused a stalemate.

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