October 21, 2021

The Queens County Citizen

Complete Canadian News World

Customers do not need receipts to benefit from one of Canada’s largest class-action settlements

Customers do not need receipts to benefit from one of Canada's largest class-action settlements

One of the largest class-action bases in Canada can be worth the money in your pocket. And depending on the size of your suit, you do not have to provide proof of purchase. Unlike some other class-action lawsuits that require rims of paperwork Application process Easy.

Vancouver attorney Naomi Kovac told Campfirente Mathews Morgerman LLP, one of the companies arising out of a lawsuit alleging anti-competitive behavior against Microsoft, “We did our part to make it as simple as possible.

The $ 517 million settlement will cost consumers $ 400 million after deducting legal fees and costs.

Kovac said more than 100,000 lawsuits have been filed in Canada since the application period began on November 23.

This agreement allows customers in Canada to claim up to $ 250 for Microsoft PC software such as Windows, Office, Word, Excel or MS-DOS purchased between December 23, 1998 and March 11, 2010, without a receipt.

“It turns out that most people don’t have proof that they went back to products they bought in 1998,” Kovac said.

Customers who purchase a Dell desktop computer with a Microsoft operating system and office suite may sue for each of those products within the years specified in the settlement.

Microsoft agrees to the solution but denies the mistake

The class-action lawsuit alleges that Microsoft and Microsoft Canada were involved in a conspiracy to illegally raise prices for the company’s products. Microsoft accepted the agreement, but denied any wrongdoing and did not accept responsibility.

The settlement in Canada is long overdue: the first documents in this case were filed in 2005 in British Columbia. Class action was also filed in Ontario and Quebec, but the court in BC stepped forward. The solution was approved by the BC Supreme Court in 2018, with courts in other provinces also approving it. This applies to people in all provinces and territories.

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Kovac says Microsoft “dominated” the personal computer software world in the 1980s and ’90s.

The class-action lawsuit alleges that Microsoft and Microsoft Canada were involved in a conspiracy to illegally raise prices for the company’s products. Canadians have until September 23, 2021 to file a lawsuit under a court-approved settlement. (Jeff Chiu / The Associated Press)

“They got into trouble with the Justice Department in the US for being told it was anti-competitive behavior, and this behavior is problematic in this case,” she said.

The break up for consumer payments was approved by the courts. Those with MS-DOS and Windows operating systems can claim $ 13. Holders of the Microsoft Office Productivity Suite are entitled to $ 8. Customers with applications other than Excel, Word and Office can claim 50 6.50.

Although the dollar amounts are small, it is possible for people to purchase multiple computers during the settlement period. Users can make a separate claim for each software application on every desktop or laptop that uses qualified Microsoft products.

Applicants must also submit an affidavit stating that the claim is accurate.

For individuals with a claim of more than $ 250, proof of purchase in excess of that number is required.

Companies that have purchased licenses in the software can file up to 50 650 claims without receipts, however proof of purchase is required in any claim beyond that amount.

The suits are open for 9 months

Since the settlement was approved in 2018, a number of details have to be created, such as hiring an administrator, determining the process of claims and creating advertisements as a way to inform the public.

Canadians are being educated about the solution through radio, TV and Internet advertising as well as web banners. They have until September 23, 2021 to file a lawsuit. After that date, administrators will begin sending individuals and vouchers to those who have purchased software licenses in bulk.

Approximately 100 million legal fees approved by the court will be deducted from the settlement, including the cost of advertising. When approving the settlement and fee adjustment in 2018, BC Supreme Court Justice Elliott Myers said “this applies to virtually non-Apple personal computer users from 1998 onwards.”

After the claims are paid, some primary and secondary schools and post-secondary institutions in Canada may claim vouchers to purchase software with the remaining money from the settlement.

The agreement states that schools with students from kindergarten to 12th grade will be given priority based on “less and / or benefit of student access to computer learning”.

Unclaimed money will be refunded to Microsoft.