October 24, 2021

The Queens County Citizen

Complete Canadian News World

A fine of nearly $ 6 million was imposed for the flight hub

A fine of nearly $ 6 million was imposed for the flight hub

The Montreal-based FlightHub Group, which operates the discount flight sites Flighthub.com and JustFly.com, and two of its directors were fined $ 8.5.8 million for imposing hidden charges on their customers, a sum that will never be paid.

Also read: Boeing 777 engine event: Favorite “Metal Fatigue” track

Also read: Damage to Boeing 777: Washington calls for in-depth inspection of some engines

Also read: Two hours between customs and room

In particular, the company was fined $ 5 million, while two of its directors, Matthew Keizer and Nicholas Hart, were fined 400 400,000, respectively, in the wake of conditions approved by the Competition Tribunal, Canada’s Competition Bureau said on Wednesday.

According to the bureau, the Montreal – based company “charged customers hidden fees, wrote positive customer reviews to promote its services, and provided numerous misleading or misleading representations about its prices and other products. Airline ticket reservation services.”

In particular, the company has been pinned for hiding fees for seat selection, and does not always reserve them for its customers; Fearing that these changes would be free, the Competition Bureau listed them for raising prices after purchasing tickets, as well as for charging additional fees for cancellation or rebooking.

The company posted enthusiastic fake reviews online, disguised as posts of satisfied customers. According to the verdict, she will have to delete these comments.

However, the decision will have no monetary impact as the FlightHub Group of Companies has been under the protection of the Creditors Arrangement Act since May 2020. If so, the fine is considered an “insecure claim.”

READ  Shortage of parts: Automotive production slows down

The Competition Bureau recalled that it had received thousands of complaints about the flight hub, which led to the start of an investigation in November 2018.