October 21, 2021

The Queens County Citizen

Complete Canadian News World

Port of Montreal | The Longshormen turned down the owner’s offer, but wanted to resume negotiations

Port of Montreal |  The Longshormen turned down the owner's offer, but wanted to resume negotiations

(Montreal) Longshormen refused overwhelmingly, and on Sunday, the employer qualified for the offer final. Their union called for the talks to resume as soon as possible. The latter is not intended to send a 72-hour strike notice, which is a mandatory step to discontinue legal work.




Andre DubakAndre Dubak
Tap

99.71% rejected the employer’s offer. The secret ballot was held Sunday from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Of the 1100 members, 1023 expressed themselves: 1020 against the employer proposal, 2 for and 1 abstinence. The participation rate is more than 91%.

“As far as we are concerned, the union and their negotiators at the negotiating table are no longer the basis for negotiations, it is the final offer of the employers. It will be hellish before the Longshormen deceive themselves with a similar employer offer,” union adviser Michelle Murray told a news conference.

According to the union, the offer contained 80 employer demands and only responded to 4 union demands.

The employers ‘party submitted a final proposal on March 12, suspending the negotiation process until union members voted on the employers’ offer.

The two sides reached a seven-month truce, during which time the parties did not speak publicly in an attempt to reach a negotiated settlement. It ended on Sunday.

From today, Quebec Inc., the Chamber of Commerce, the Employers’ Council, will respond to the blow to the media with all the effigies with sparrows to set the record straight.

Michelle Murray, Longshoremens Union Councilor

The union already has a warrant in its pocket to call a strike. It is valid for 60 days and ends on April 15.

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“Mediation continues”

The Longshoremens Union, a member of the Canadian Union of Public Employees, invites employers to sit down at the negotiating table as soon as possible. “Our desire is to negotiate with the employers. We did not send a strike notice,” Murray insisted.

The union promised to contact federally-appointed mediators late Sunday afternoon to inform them of the vote result and the longshoremen’s willingness to resume talks. “The mediation will continue,” Murray said.

The main problem is related to the work schedule. Longshormen complained that he had to work 19 out of 21 days. At a press conference, Councilor Murray said the Longshormen were ready to earn less instead of a better work-life balance.

According to the Maritime Employers Association (AEM), which represents employers, the average salary is 6,126,000, not counting margin benefits.

“We prefer a positive vote, but we have noticed the union agreeing to continue negotiations,” the MEA said at the end of the day. We are considering our options and our priority will be resolved as soon as possible. ”

Reactions

“In a flash, the garbage was avoided on Sunday,” commented Mark Kodiux, president of the Quebec Trucking Association. According to the Port Authority, 2,500 containers enter or leave the port by truck every day. Mr Kodiak called on Canadian Labor Minister Philomena Tassi to take the necessary steps to resolve the situation, which has been going on for two years.

“The federal government has the leadership to resolve the stalemate at the port of Montreal,” said Jasmine Gunnett, vice president of national affairs for the Canadian Federation of Independent Business, which represents SMEs. According to a recent survey by its members, half of Quebec founders are worried and fear negative consequences if a strike occurs in the port of Montreal.

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For its part, the Employers ‘Council welcomed the union’s desire to continue negotiations, but vehemently rejected the employers’ offer. “This is good news for a day that doesn’t have much,” President and CEO Carl Blackburn said in an interview. Uncertainty has persuaded ship owners to divert deliveries to other destinations, which he fears could hurt the Montreal economy.

The union last week hijacked the first ship to Halifax.