October 24, 2021

The Queens County Citizen

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Attack on Capitol Hill: A serious critic of Trump sits on the Commission of Inquiry

Attack on Capitol Hill: A serious critic of Trump sits on the Commission of Inquiry

Democrats on Thursday appointed Republicans and a fierce critic of Donald Trump to sit on a commission of inquiry into the January 6 assassination attempt on Capitol Hill by supporters of the former US president.

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Elected House of Representatives Liz Cheney was recently removed from the Republican hierarchy because she accused the billionaire of inciting an attack on a congressional seat too loudly, saying she was honored.

“Those responsible for this attack must be taken into account and this special commission will respond in a professional, expeditious and impartial manner to this responsibility,” she said in a statement.

Liz Cheney was one of two Republicans who voted in favor of forming the special committee in the House on Wednesday.

With the authority to support witnesses and petitions, the commission was approved by a total of 220 House Democrats, preventing Republicans from setting up a more independent inquiry into Congress.

The latter said that a parliamentary investigation was already underway and that the work of the police was adequate. At least 500 people have been charged in the case.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has appointed Democrat Benny Thompson to chair the special committee. A civil complaint was filed in February against Donald Trump for committing a murderous attack.

In all, thirteen MPs, including seven Democrats, sit on it. Republican minority leader Kevin McCarthy could nominate six Republicans, but has not yet said whether he will.

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Nancy Pelosi assured the commission that it would “find the truth” about the attack by pro-Trump protesters when members of parliament convened to confirm Joe Biden’s victory in the November 2020 presidential election.

It may unveil its resolutions in 2022 in the midst of campaigning for parliamentary and local by-elections.