October 27, 2021

The Queens County Citizen

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Poland | Considering the media law after the split of the government coalition

Poland |  Considering the media law after the split of the government coalition

(Warsaw) Polish MPs are due to review a new law on Wednesday that, according to the opposition, threatens press freedom after the break-up of the conservative-nationalist coalition in power.




The law, known as “Lex TVN”, would force American Group Discovery to sell a majority stake in its flagship Polish private television network TVN.

According to the ruling law and justice (PiS) party, this law is necessary to prevent hostile foreign powers from controlling the broadcasters in the country.

On Tuesday evening, protests erupted across Poland, banning non-European companies from owning more than 49% of the Polish media company.

Dissent over the law is one reason why Prime Minister Mathews Moraviki decided to remove his deputy, Jaroslav Govin, the leader of the Entent party, one of the three parties in the ruling coalition.

Shortly afterwards, Mr Govin announced that he was leaving the Law and Justice (PIS) -led coalition.

Withdrawal of his party from the coalition does not mean that the government will automatically fall, as a formal no-confidence motion is required in parliament.

Wednesday’s vote on “Lex TVN” is the first test of PiS ‘ability to raise a new parliamentary majority.

GMT is scheduled to begin parliamentary sessions at 9:30 a.m., but a voting date is not yet known.

According to observers, the PiS now has to rely on MPs from other parties, including the extreme right to retain its majority and pass legislation.

“Poland is facing a minority government and a decline in power,” tweeted Jasek Nijinkievich, a daily Rzeczpospolita commentator.

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He said the PIS would try to persuade Mr Govin party MPs to support the government.

“The United Right government will continue to work because there are people in Diet (the lower house of the Polish parliament) who want to support our government,” government spokesman Piotr Mller said Wednesday.