May 18, 2022

The Queens County Citizen

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Glyphosate | Bayer suffered a legal setback, losing more than 6% of the action

Glyphosate |  Bayer suffered a legal setback, losing more than 6% of the action

(Frankfurt) Bayer has faced a legal backlash in the United States over glyphosate, a general counsel before the Supreme Court who gave a negative opinion in Wednesday’s controversy over an agrokismist with the effect of a sharp decline in the title.

Posted yesterday at 12:17 p.m.

The Dox gained 2.17% to 58.04 euros, down 6.22% during the session in the title Frankfurt, leaving investors chilled by the court decision, which could pave the way for billions of euros in claims for damages.

The case in question dates back to May 2021, when the San Francisco Court of Appeals upheld a $ 25 million lawsuit filed against Bayer in 2015 by Edwin Hardman, a retiree suffering from non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma.

He alleges that Herbicide Roundup caused his cancer and that Monsanto, which Bayer bought in 2018, failed to warn customers about the product label.

Bayer has filed an appeal in the United States Supreme Court. But in her opinion submitted to the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday, General Attorney Elizabeth Priloger, representing the government, affirmed that “the request for asylum should be rejected.”

His opinion indicates a change in the administration’s tone from the Trump presidency, with the Justice Department siding with Bayer during the call.

“The court reconsidered the United States’ arguments due to a change in decision and administration,” the attorney general explained.

In a press release, Bayer said he still believes the court has good legal arguments to examine Edwin Hardeman’s case and “correct the verdict.”

“Regardless of the decision, we are ready to end the lawsuit around Roundup,” Bayer said, allocating $ 4.5 billion in July 2021 in the event of an unfavorable decision.

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The group particularly disputes the Court of Appeals’ ruling because it relies on California state law, where the Federal Agency for Environmental Protection (EPA) estimates that the use of roundup does not qualify for a special cancer warning.

But this does not exclude respect for “state-level law that requires such a warning,” the attorney general said.

The main active ingredient in Roundup is glyphosate, which has been classified by the World Health Organization (WHO) International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) as a “potential carcinogen” by a German group.