August 9, 2022

The Queens County Citizen

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On the bedside tables of our booksellers

On the bedside tables of our booksellers

Throughout the month of July, booksellers tell us what their current must-reads are. This week: Cassandre Seoi, co-founder of Hannenorak bookstore in Wendake, reveals her favorites in Indigenous literature.

Posted at 7:00 am

Laila Malouf

Laila Malouf
Press

Nanabush’s kiss

“He is a very prolific Ojibway native writer. In this book, he describes cheater — He is a prankster, a troublemaker in local mythology — who comes into a community in the form of a person on a motorcycle and makes a bit of a mess in people’s daily lives. It’s really funny, there’s a lot of humour, the dialogues are tasteful; In the various primitive universes, especially as we find them in what is now English Canada, the author skilfully combines the supernatural with the real. I think it is a perfect mix between tradition and modernity. He is a writer to discover. »

Nanabush's kiss

Nanabush’s kiss

are talking

Heat it up outside

“The author is an Innu poet from Mashteyuatsh, a community near Roberwal. In this collection, the starting point is separation. It allows him to go back to the past and beautiful moments shared with a loved one. Despite the sense of pain, loss, this is poetry rooted in the carnal side and, at the same time, in popular culture and territory. […] It is like medicine for the heart, reading this collection is good; One has the impression of being with the narrator on the river bank, listening to the wind in the trees. It is very touching, very funny at times and very sensual. »

We don’t cry at bingo

“This is the first novel of one of my favorite authors, which was translated a few years ago. We follow the author’s ego from childhood to adulthood. […] Set in another province, in a remote Aboriginal community, we instantly relate to the characters as we always know them. With Don Dumont, there’s always a lot of humor, a lot of self-deprecation. She has a gift for touching on sometimes difficult subjects, such as the history of residential schools, without turning to tears or falling into pathos, thanks to irony. It’s a feel-good read, a one-off read, and one that allows us to enter the Aboriginal question, but from another angle. »

We don't cry at bingo

We don’t cry at bingo

Hanover