October 17, 2021

The Queens County Citizen

Complete Canadian News World

Top YouTube Trends in Canada

To call YouTube a simple video-sharing platform at this point would be a huge understatement. The very name has become inseparable from online entertainment, with more content always around the corner. Keeping up with it all can be quite the pain, though, simply because new trends never stop popping up.

With that in mind, let’s take a look at some of the most popular YouTube trends in Canada in 2021. To be clear, we won’t be talking about specific viral videos or content creators. In this article, we’ll focus more on the broad strokes of what people want to see on YouTube.

Guides and How-Tos

Various tutorials and DIY guides went through a meteoric rise in popularity all throughout 2020. This makes sense in a way – perhaps the COVID-19 pandemic and subsequent lockdown inspired people to go out and look for new hobbies to fill the time. IT just goes to show how productive some extra free time can be in the long run.

For example, do-it-yourself videos have gone up a solid 42% in viewership since the lockdown began. In this category, we’re including two things: various tutorials and informative videos and vlog-style content of people just enjoying their hobbies.

The former was rather expected for at least two reasons. The first we mostly covered – people are getting into new hobbies and pastimes. Instructional videos can go a long way in helping someone pick up a new hobby or interest, so the extra attention is understandable. Besides that, educational videos saw a rapid surge because schools across the country were forced to switch to an online-only format. As it seems, YouTube content can be a fun and innovative way to keep students’ attention while studying outside the classroom.

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As for the latter of the two, it’s not as easy to explain. Most viewers simply point at the fact that watching someone be good at something can be a cathartic experience. Others state that, in trying times, something relaxing and completely disconnected from what’s going on in the world can be downright therapeutic.

Specific topics that are especially popular include meal preparation and cooking and study guides.

Gaming

This part shouldn’t even be much of a surprise. Gaming is a distinct sub-culture in the sphere of YouTube videos, taking up a good chunk of the site’s total viewership. This amounts to billions of views worldwide – 15 billion in 2020, to be exact.

As far as video gaming in Canada goes, the stats aren’t that impressive but are still going through a notable uptick compared to previous years. This is most easily seen in French-speaking Canadian gaming videos, surprisingly enough, which have gone up a whole 6% from 2019.

Demographically speaking, it shouldn’t be surprising that gaming videos mostly attract young viewers. Most kids and teens get their entertainment from YouTube more than TV these days, and gaming is especially significant.

Casino Gaming

We can also spot a certain trend among online casinos in 2020 and early 2021. Due in part to the pandemic and subsequent lockdown, the online gambling industry has experienced unprecedented growth. With it came YouTube videos related to the topic, as one might expect.

These videos come down to two types – information about online casinos and casino games are the first. Turns out there is plenty to talk about on the topic – from game and casino reviews to various strategies, tips, and tricks. Some websites actively seek out niche audiences or specialize in some types of casino content. Casino Chick is one such site, focusing on women in online gambling. It contains guides, reviews, and casino information for women interested in online casino games.

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At-Home Fitness

Another industry hugely impacted by the lockdown is related to fitness. Gyms were forced to close down, most sports competitions were suspended, but people still needed a physical outlet. Perhaps now more than ever, seeing how physical activity was forcefully brought to a minimum. Moreover, focusing on health this way is great for staying happy in turbulent times.

It should come as no surprise, then, that physical fitness at home instructional videos surged during the pandemic. YouTube searches for ‘home workout’ and related content spiked after March. On average, people searched for such video content three to four times more than pre-lockdown.

Content creators quickly rushed to fill the newfound demand. There are currently more than 8,000 channels actively relating to home fitness – which is quite the number for a relatively niche concept. Daily uploads of videos about home workouts have gone up 55% globally, which means the apparent health craze is not specific to Canadians.